Saturday, 7 August 2004

The rape of a nation

THE SHAME OF A NATION

By: Cindy-Lou Dale

If the future of a country is said to lie in its children, why then is South Africa so determined to obliterate and defile theirs?

The violent culture in South Africa has bred another abomination - babies are being raped, infected with HIV/AIDS and then dumped in trash cans and garbage dumps. These latest victims cannot say ‘no’ - they are too young to speak or walk.

Police statistics state that 58 babies are raped daily; this number could effectively be doubled as Interpol warns that upward of 50% of serious crime goes unreported.

"Political correctness, Marxism, the Mandela myth, race-blame and affirmative action be damned – there are tribal medicine men that have the bizarre belief that sex with a virgin, even a baby, will cure HIV/AIDS," says Phillip and Pat Van Rensburg, a Cape Town couple who have turned their home into a hospital called "Little Angels" and rescue victims of baby rape.

Some baby rapists have gone beyond penile penetration, pushing broken bottle tops or sticks into the victim’s vagina.

Some 5-million South African are infected with HIV/AIDS. Yet the government still drags its heels in its inaction in the fight against the deadly disease. President Mbeki has described the antiretroviral drug as "toxic", and questioned the link between HIV and AIDS, whilst the Minister of Health insists "a diet of garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and plenty of root vegetables", will assist in combating the effects of HIV/AIDS.

SAPA are quoted as saying that women born in South Africa have a greater chance of being raped, than learning to read.

Citizens are afraid to report crime as police are arrogant, insensitive, incompetent, lack professionalism and few cases are investigated. Perpetrators are rarely held accountable for their actions, deterrence is non-existent and prison sentences are light.

A shocking UCA report states there to be sharp discrepancies between official statistics and those of Interpol and the Medical Research Council. One observer is quoted as saying that the "easiest way for the police to reduce the crime rate is simply to do nothing but record only those crimes where a case number is absolutely mandatory". Numerous experts are quoted as suspecting "serious under reporting"; "perhaps these figures are concealed for political reasons’; "the reason for this under reporting could be the desire to change the ongoing reputation of South Africa as the crime capital of the world."

There is now general societal acceptance of these monstrous actions. According to a child support group, Childline, one in four girls faces the prospect of being raped before the age of 16.

A report to the Parliamentary Task Group of Sexual Abuse of Children is quoted as stating, "… society is sick since it views children as disposable, views sex as casual, tolerates degrading depiction of women and to a large extent tolerates rape."

A teenage mother found that her screaming and bleeding 9-months old had been brutally raped and sodomized by a male friend.

Another 9-month-old baby girl survived a gang rape attack and underwent a full hysterectomy and further surgery to repair intestinal damage.

A one-month old baby was raped by her uncles.

Two men raped a five-month-old girl.

The youngest victim yet was one week old.

A two-year-old was raped and sodomized to death but her rapist and killer walked free after a policeman bungled the murder scene, examining her young corpse and deciding "nothing was wrong".

Could this be a ‘legacy of apartheid’, as the ruling ANC government claim? "Nobody cares about anybody, other than themselves, which manifests in aggressive behavior of whatever kind, says psychologist and volunteer at a rape crisis centre, Penny Tywana. "Most of the rape offenders are young men - many born and raised in the mid to late1980s, the most violent days of apartheid."

What is the government response? The Police Commissioner has accused the media of "feeding the nation a ‘psychosis of fear, despair and distrust in the authorities" and requested that all media communications be channeled through police HQ.

The criminal justice system has failed women and children in South Africa. Baby rape is clearly not a priority.

Upwards of fifty percent of serious crime goes unreported.

Fifty percent of all drugs delivered to the country's Government-run hospitals get stolen from their storerooms.

Every twenty-six seconds a woman is raped in South Africa.

Ninety four percent of all persons released after serving a sentence immediately become re-offenders.

South Africa has the highest recorded per capita murder rate, second only to Columbia.

One in four South African policemen is illiterate.

The per capita murder rate in the USA was six per 100,000 while in South Africa it was fifty-nine per 100,000.

For every 100,000 crimes committed in South Africa only 430 criminals were arrested. Of these, only seventy-seven were convicted and barely eight of these were sentenced to two or more years of imprisonment.

In the first five years of ANC rule, violence and crime in South Africa officially increased by thirty-three percent.

In the forty-four years from 1950 to 1993, there was an average of 7,036 murders per year. This covered the turbulent times of the apartheid years of conflict, terrorism and riots.

However, under the ANC rule, Interpol’s statistics state the murder rate has averaged 47,882 per year.

What happened to all the enlightened folk that banded together and boycotted companies doing business with South Africa in the 1980s? Where are the howls of rage from Whoopie Goldberg, Oprah Winfrey and Danny Glover? They have gone conspicuously quiet.

In the time it has taken you to read this article, nine women have been raped in South Africa and one baby girl is in the tortured process of having her life destroyed.

"Published originally at EtherZone.com : republication allowed with this notice and hyperlink intact."

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